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/Factsheet_print/Tradespeople/Motor_repairers_and_insurers/_Repairers_of_caravans_and_trailers.pdf
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Standard fact sheet.

Repairers of caravans and trailers 

New laws commenced 1 December 2014

The Motor Dealers and Repairers Act 2013 replaced the former Motor Dealers Act 1974 and the Motor Vehicle Repairs Act 1980.

All businesses that specialise in underbody repairs on caravans and trailers will be required to be licensed as a repairer under the Motor Dealers and Repairers Act 2013. However, the people doing the work do not need to have tradesperson certificate so long as the work is being done at the place of business of the licensed repairer and the work is only on caravans or trailers.

Licensed repair work on caravans and trailers involves repairs to the underbody of a trailer or caravan and includes such things as the brakes, suspension, axle, wheels, tyres and chassis. Existing caravan repairer businesses have until 1 September 2015 to obtain a motor vehicle repairer's licence from NSW Fair Trading.

A repairer licence is not required to work on the living area of a caravan, but such work will continue to be regulated under other existing laws (eg. electrical wiring work).

Why are repairers of caravans and trailers not required to get a tradesperson certificate?

Under the former Motor Vehicle Repairs Act 1980 caravan repairers were not required to hold a tradesperson certificate. Under the new Act, there are minimum qualification requirements to be able to get a tradesperson certificate. These are based on nationally accredited qualifications endorsed by the Australian Skills Quality Authority. There is no single nationally accredited qualification for repair work on both trailers and caravans that could form the basis of a tradesperson certificate.

Most of the repairs done on trailers and caravans could fit within many classes of repair work, which would be very costly for the repairer to have to obtain a tradesperson certificate in multiple repair classes to undertake repairs on a caravan.

Businesses that contract to do work on caravans and trailers will be required to be licensed and consumers are able to seek remedies against licensees about the manner in which any repair work has been done. Licensees are also obliged to ensure that repair work is done with due care and skill under the consumer guarantees of the Australian Consumer Law.

Other vehicle repairs exempt from the Act

A licence is not required to work on certain other types of vehicles. These include:

  • vehicles not acquired for the transport of goods or passengers on public roads
  • vehicles that are not capable of being registered in NSW.

Licensing requirements for repair work on heavy vehicles

From 27 February 2015, repairers of motor vehicles with a mass over 4.5 tonnes (i.e. those covered by the Heavy Vehicle National Law) will be regulated under the Motor Dealers and Repairers Act 2013 and Motor Dealers and Repairers Regulation 2014.

This means that repairer businesses that contract to do underbody repairs on caravans and trailers with a mass over 4.5 tonnes will require a motor vehicle repairer’s licence. However, the people doing the work do not need to have tradesperson certificate so long as the work is being done at the place of business of the licensed repairer and the work is only on caravans or trailers.

Transitional arrangements

Until 1 September 2015 motor vehicle repairers will be able to download copies of prescribed forms free of charge from the Fair Trading website.

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