Change text size:   Increase font size   Reduce font size  |   Print page:   Print this page
  |   Contact us   
 
cooperatives_and_associations
English

Games of chance 

A game of chance is any game, usually played for money or some other prize, where chance determines the winner – such as drawing numbers, turning cards or tossing coins.

While games of chance can involve some element of skill, luck decides the outcome. The result is random, so anyone can win, or lose.

Art unions 

An art union is a lottery to raise money for a non-profit organisation.

The total retail value of prizes must be more than $30,000, but the total value of money prizes can't be more than $30,000. If the prize is a tour or journey, money cannot form more than 20% of the value of the prize.

A minimum of 30% of the gross proceeds must go to a not-for-profit organisation.

You need a permit to run an art union lottery and must lodge an application. For more information or to apply, view or download in PDF:

Top of page

Card jackpot games 

This free entry lottery usually involves a pack of 52 playing cards and a joker all lying face down. Players turn a card for the chance to win a prize by choosing the joker. If no one draws the joker, the prize jackpots and or​ganisers repeat the draw.

A card jackpot game is a form of trade promotion, so a permit is required and there is an application fee. For more information or to apply, view or download in PDF format:

If you link a raffle to a card jackpot game and sell tickets, a minimum of 40% of the gross proceeds must go to a not-for-profit organisation. You must make the lottery rules – also known as terms and conditions – easily available to all entrants. View or download in PDF format the Terms and conditions template for card jackpot and similar games (size: 240kb).

Top of page

Charity housie 

Charity housie – also cash housie – is similar to club bingo. However, organisations conduct charity housie to raise money for charities. Players usually use electronic or printed tickets bearing numbered squares.

A housie caller chooses numbers at random and announces them to the players. Each player marks off the numbers on their ticket as the caller announces them. A player wins when they mark off all the numbers in a particular series e.g. one line, race track or full house.

The main difference to club bingo is that prizes can be cash – up to $5,000. In bingo, prizes cannot be cash. The total value of prizes cannot be more than $5,000.

You can only conduct charity housie to raise money for a charity and you must lodge a permit application. The charity must receive at least 12.5% of the gross proceeds from the sale of the housie tickets. For more information or to apply, view or download in PDF format:

Top of page

Chocolate wheels 

Chocolate wheels are where people buy numbered tickets. The organiser spins a wheel that has numbers matching those on the tickets. Once the wheel stops on a specific number, the person holding that numbered ticket wins a prize.

You can only run a chocolate wheel to raise money for a not-for-profit organisation and you must lodge a permit application. A minimum of 40% of the gross proceeds must go to a not-for-profit organisation. You can give away a maximum of $500 as a prize. For more information or to apply, view or download in PDF format:

Top of page

Club bingo 

Club bingo is also known as bingo or housie.

You can only conduct club bingo at a club registered under the Registered Clubs Act 1976 to attract people to the club's premises. You can sell tickets only to members and their guests.

You cannot offer cash prizes. A single prize value cannot exceed $40 and the total value of prizes in one game cannot be more than $70.

You do not need a permit for club bingo.

For more information, view or download the Club bingo fact sheet (in PDF: 78kb).

Top of page

Football doubles 

A football double is a type of no-draw lottery that involves buying sealed tickets with numbers printed on them. The winner is the person whose numbers match the jersey numbers of the first 2 scorers in a particular football match.

You can only conduct this game to raise funds for a not-for-profit organisation and you do not need a permit. A minimum of 40% of the gross profits must go to a not-for-profit organisation.

Total value of prizes cannot exceed $7,000.

For more information, view or download the Football doubles fact sheet (in PDF: 210kb).

Top of page

Gaming nights (casino nights) 

The format of gaming nights usually involve people getting or buying chips, tokens or imitation money to play casino games such as roulette, blackjack or crown and anchor.

You can hold gaming nights as entertainment, or to raise funds for a not-for-profit organisation. The chips people use during a gaming night must not have a value that players can redeem for cash.

You do not need a permit for a gaming night.

For more information, view or download the Gaming nights fact sheet (in PDF: 55kb).

Top of page

Gratuitous lotteries 

Examples of these lotteries include lucky door or lucky seat promotions, complete a survey, or early bird purchase of art union tickets.

The total value of prizes cannot exceed $30,000 and the law prohibits money prizes. You don't need a permit for a gratuitous lottery.

You cannot conduct a gratuitous lottery to promote any trade or business. To promote any trade or business, you need to apply for a trade promotions permit (see below). You cannot charge an entry or participation fee for this type of lottery.

For more information, view or download the Gratuitous lotteries fact sheet​ (in PDF: 65kb)​​.

Top of page

Guessing competitions 

A guessing competition is a form of raffle – if you sell tickets for people to enter. This is a popular way for not-for-profit organisations to raise money.

The total retail value of your prize – or the total value of your money prize – cannot be more than $30,000.

A minimum of 40% of the gross proceeds must go to a not-for-profit organisation.

You don't need a permit to hold a guessing competition.

For more information, view or download the Raffles fact sheet (in PDF: 90kb).

Top of page

Lucky envelopes 

This is a game where participants win a prize if they expose a hidden number that is the same as a number displayed on a chart at a point of sale.

You can only run a lucky envelope game to raise money for a charity and you must lodge an application.

A minimum of 40% of the gross proceeds must go to a charity.

For more information or to apply, view or download in PDF format:

Top of page

Mini-numbers 

Mini-numbers lotteries go by many names – mini-lotto, lionball, kick-a-ball, make-a-mark and pick-the-pack.

A player pays a small entry fee and selects 6 numbers from a maximum of 20. Organisers draw 6 numbers. If a player gets all 6 numbers he or she wins a prize. The prize jackpots to the next draw if no one has all 6 numbers.

You can only run a mini-numbers lottery to raise money for a not-for-profit organisation. You don't need a permit.

The total value of cash prizes must not be more than $10,000. The total value of prizes cannot exceed $20,000 and must be at least 50% of the gross proceeds. A minimum of 40% of the gross proceeds must go to a not-for-profit organisation.

For more information, view or download the Mini-numbers fact sheet (in PDF: 189kb).

Top of page

No-draw lotteries 

No-draw lotteries are also known as break-open or scratch lotteries.

Players buy a ticket that contains one or more hidden symbols that they reveal by removing or scratching off some covering material. The tickets are similar to scratch lottery tickets.

The total value of prizes cannot exceed $10,000.

You can only run a no-draw lottery to raise money for a non-profit organisation. You don't need a permit.

For more information, view or download the No-draw lotteries fact sheet (in PDF: 131kb).

Top of page

Progressive lotteries 

Progressive lotteries are games where you conduct a number of draws on various dates over a set period.

The most common types of progressive lotteries are hundred clubs,silver circles and tipping competitions.

You can only run a progressive lottery for entertainment or to raise money for a not-for-profit organisation. The total value of money prizes cannot exceed $7,000 and you don't need a permit if you keep total sales below $25,000.

For more information, view or download the Progressive lotteries fact sheet (in PDF:109kb).

However, if total sales will be more than $25,000 you must apply for a permit. View or download the Progressive lotteries application form (in PDF: 420kb).

Top of page

Promotional raffles 

Registered clubs can run promotional raffles to entertain members and other patrons. They are different to raffles designed to raise funds.

The maximum value of a single prize you can offer is $150. However, you can offer one special prize valued at up to $700. You can also offer a bonus prize but its value cannot be more than $70. You cannot offer cash prizes.

You don't need a permit for a promotional raffle. However, you can conduct this game only on the premises of a registered club.

For more information, view or download the Promotional raffles fact sheet (in PDF: 81kb)​.

Top of page

Raffles (fund raising) 

A raffle is a lottery where the total retail value of the prizes – or the total value of money prizes – doesn't exceed $30,000.

Organisers usually determine prizes by drawing tickets from a barrel or other container, or by using an electronic device (often called a random number generator).

You can only run a raffle to raise money for a not-for-profit organisation. You don't need a permit.

A minimum of 40% of the gross proceeds must go to a not-for-profit organisation.

For more information, view or download the Raffles fact sheet (in PDF: 90kb).

Top of page

Social housie 

Social housie is a game where players use electronic or printed tickets bearing numbered squares or symbols. The cost of a card or ticket cannot be more than 40 cents.

A housie caller chooses numbers or symbols at random and announces them to the players. Each player marks off the numbers or symbols on their ticket as the caller announces them. A player wins when they are first to mark off all the numbers or symbols on their ticket.

You can conduct social housie only for entertainment, or to raise funds for a not-for-profit organisation.

You don't need a permit for social housie, but you can't conduct this game on the premises of a registered club or on licensed premises.

You can offer cash prizes, however the total value of prizes in a game cannot exceed $40 and the total value of jackpot prizes in a session of games cannot be more than $200.

For more information, view or download the Social housie fact sheet​ (in PDF: 97kb).

Top of page

Sweeps and calcuttas 

A sweep is a game where a player buys a ticket that gives them a contestant – such as a horse or another competitor – in an event. The Melbourne Cup is a good example.

The sweep organisers distribute the prize pool (all or some of the total ticket sales) to the players who hold the winners and placegetters in the event.

A calcutta is the same as a sweep up to the completion of the draw. After the draw, an auction takes place where everyone who bought a ticket can bid for each contestant in turn.

Players who succeed in the draw can sell their contestant and take half of the proceeds, or keep the contestant by making (and paying half of) the highest bid.

Anyone can conduct a sweep or calcutta for entertainment or to raise money for a not-for-profit organisation.

However, an application must be lodged to conduct a sweep or calcutta if total sales are more than $20,000.

For more information or to apply for an application, view or download in PDF:

Top of page

Tipping competitions 

A tipping competition is a type of progressive lottery where players forecast the results of a sporting contest and accumulate points for successful predictions.

Organisers distribute the prize pool to the people who acquire the most points over a set period, such as a season's worth of football.

You can run a tipping competition partly to entertain and partly to raise money for a not-for-profit organisation.

The total value of money prizes cannot exceed $7,000.

You must apply for a trade promotions permit when the prizes are worth more than $25,000, when there is no entry fee, or when the prize pool exceeds the total amount paid by players as entrance fees – less any costs incurred in running the competition.

For more information or to apply for a permit, view or download in PDF:

Top of page

Trade promotions 

This free-entry lottery allows businesses to promote their goods or services. It's sometimes called a sweepstake, competition, contest or giveaway and it must have an element of chance to determine whether a prize is awarded.

However, trade promotions do not include games of skill where organisers judge the entries, such as a "write in 25 words or less" competition.

The most common example of a trade promotion is when people buy a particular good or service and get the chance to enter a lottery to win a prize.

To run a trade promotion lottery a permit is required and an application fee applies. ​Lottery rules, also known as "terms and conditions", must be freely available to entrants.

To apply for a Trade promotion lottery permit:

Businesses wanting to run a trade promotions lottery can view or download the Trade promotions fact sheet for businesses (in PDF: 840kb). Applicants granted a Trade promotion lottery permit must adhere to the certain conditions. View or download Trade promotion permit conditions (in PDF: size: 227kb)

Consumers who want to know their rights with a trade promotions lottery can view or download the Trade promotions fact sheet for consumers (in PDF: 102kb)​.


Trade promotion amendment 

​To change an existing Trade promotion permit, an amendment permit is required and a fee applies. To apply, view or download the Trade promotion lottery amendment form (in PDF: 92kb)​.

Top of page

Get a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader so you can access PDF versions of our information.