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/Factsheet_print/Consumers/Product_and_service_safety/Childrens_products/_Safe_toys.pdf
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Standard fact sheet.
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Large print fact sheet.

Safe toys 

See which toys failed Fair Trading's safety inspection this year - download our Christmas product safety survey 2016 (PDF size: 3.51Mb)

Read the media release: Toys destroyed in Christmas crackdown

For many years, NSW Fair Trading has targeted dangerous toys. While toys in today's marketplace are generally much safer than a decade ago, each year Fair Trading detects new products which have the potential to cause injury or even death to young children. Toys with small parts are a particular worry. Anything smaller than a ping pong ball or an Australian 20 cent coin could choke a child under 3 years.

You can check for banned children's products on the Product Safety Australia website.

Check your list twice for unsafe toys

When shopping for a child's wish list this Christmas, and during the sales period, it is important to consider toys that may pose a threat or hazard to them.

A small child can swallow part of a toy or become entangled in something, which is why toys for young children must meet strict standards.

The 'Five S’s of Toy Safety' is a good place to start to select safer, age-appropriate toys:

  • Size - the smaller the child, the bigger the toy should be (anything smaller than a 20 cent piece or ping pong ball is too small for a child under 3).
  • Shape - be wary of products that, because of their shape, may be easily swallowed or have sharp edges or points.
  • Surface - make sure all finishes are non-toxic (this should be stated on packaging).
  • Strings - anything over 30cm is a strangulation hazard for a small child and should be removed.
  • Supervision - nothing replaces close supervision.

If you have purchased an unsafe toy, you can return the toy to the store for a refund or dispose of the toy immediately.

There are further considerations when buying toys - consult our rules below.

Common sense rules when buying toys

Here are some common sense rules to follow when buying toys:

  • Check for sharp edges or rough surfaces as they can cause cuts and splinters.
  • Buy washable, non-breakable toys for babies. Anything smaller than a 20 cent piece can choke a child under three years old.
  • Toy chests and boxes should be designed not to close on top of children, or better still with a removable lid. Anything big enough to crawl inside must have ventilation holes.
  • Read the age labelling on new toys. 'Not suitable for children under three' means that there are small parts which could be swallowed; it is not an indication of skill level or intelligence.
  • Check toys regularly for loose parts which may be choking dangers.
  • Check that there are no gaps or holes which could entrap a child's fingers.
  • If buying a projectile toy, only choose ones that have soft, one-piece darts or non-removable suction caps.
  • Be wary of toys that make loud noises as they can be harmful to hearing. Particularly toys which are held against the ear, such as walkie talkies and toy mobile phones.
  • Check for ventilation before buying tents, masks, helmets etc.
  • Ensure that ride-on toys are appropriate to the age of the child and are stable. Toy bikes should have effective brakes which can be applied by the rider.
  • Check toys that contain magnets to ensure that they have not come loose. Remove loose magnets from the toy box.
  • Remember that rings, inflatable arm bands, kick boards and inflatable toys are not safety devices and children in the water must be supervised at all times to prevent drowning.

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